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Neutrik’s speakON Connector Turns 30
Neutrik’s speakON Connector Turns 30

Neutrik’s speakON Connector Turns 30

George Petersen
Milestones

A major breakthrough for the live industry came in 1987, with Neutrik’s debut of the speakON created specifically for speaker connections. A new EU European Low Voltage Directive required that any connector capable of carrying more than 50 volts must be protected against inadvertent contact. Obviously, other connectors — such as banana plugs and 1/4-inch styles — did not meet this requirement.

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Illustration by Andy Au
Illustration by Andy Au

Health Care or Lack of It

Baker Lee
FOH at Large

Trying to have a conversation about “Obamacare” opens the door to a maelstrom of hyperbole, rumors, partisan fear mongering and polarizing finger pointing. Having a similar conversation regarding “The Affordable Care Act” elicits a kinder and gentler response to the conversation even though — to quote William Shakespeare — “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. Add a comment

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Catalina Jazz Club - small stage, big sounds.
Catalina Jazz Club - small stage, big sounds.

Downsizing in Hollywood

David Morgan
On the Digital Edge

Mixing the Steve Gadd Band at the Catalina Jazz Club

It’s been a very long time since I worked a club gig. There have been many occasions when I have worked at club venues while on tour, but always using our tour audio FOH and monitor setups. So I am a bit out of practice. Still, I jumped at the chance to spend four nights at the Catalina Jazz Club (Hollywood, CA) mixing for my friends in the Steve Gadd Band. This fantastic jazz ensemble consists of Steve Gadd, drums; Walt Fowler, trumpet/flugelhorn; Jimmy Johnson, bass; Mike Landau, guitar; and Larry Goldings (now Kevin Hayes), keyboards. These men, of course, are each regulars in James Taylor’s All-Star Band and they are a significant part of my road family. I was extremely flattered when the guys had asked me to participate, and I was happy I could be there for them.

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Soundcheck is among those businesses that have expanded to meet a growing market need for pre-tour rehearsal facilities.
Soundcheck is among those businesses that have expanded to meet a growing market need for pre-tour rehearsal facilities.

Practice, Practice, Practice: Rehearsal Facilities Amp Their Game

Dan Daley
The Biz

One of the byproducts of the vastly increased emphasis on live music in recent years is the need to rehearse it, and these days that takes a lot more than a suburban garage and acquiescent neighbors. As a result, the number of rehearsal facilities geared for high-end professional applications has proliferated in recent years, and the size of the rooms in them has also increased, to accommodate more sophisticated production capabilities — even duos in hotel lobbies might sport a fogger or moving lights.

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Fig. 1: DiGiCo SD10 EQ screen showing typical rock kick EQ. Note boost at 4k Hz to add beater definition.
Fig. 1: DiGiCo SD10 EQ screen showing typical rock kick EQ. Note boost at 4k Hz to add beater definition.

Can You Hear What I’m Seeing?

Steve LaCerra
Theory and Practice

Suggested EQ for Common Sources
One of the most important tools we use on a regular basis is EQ. Sometimes we use it to correct problems, and other times we use it creatively. It’s worth taking a look at some techniques for applying EQ to common input channels. The photos below were taken from the screen of a DiGiCo SD10 mixing console. Keep in mind that EQ is, of course, intimately tied to the quality of the source as well as microphone selection, so these are just starting points. YMMV.

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Fig. 1: This simple chart of wave sizes — measured at 20°C (68° F) — should illustrate why materials such as 2-inch acoustical foam are ineffective at treating low-frequency waves.
Fig. 1: This simple chart of wave sizes — measured at 20°C (68° F) — should illustrate why materials such as 2-inch acoustical foam are ineffective at treating low-frequency waves.

Controlling Excess LF Energy in Your Worship Space

Vince Lepore
Sound Sanctuary

Managing low frequency energy is a notoriously difficult proposition. The very nature of low frequencies is that they are large (see Fig. 1), difficult to control from a directional perspective and difficult to treat from an acoustical perspective. If you mix in rooms that have little or no acoustic treatment (as many of us do), trying to get your low-end under control can be a real challenge. Add a comment

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